The significance of citation in academic writing transcends time, acting as a cornerstone for academic integrity. It serves as a testament to the credibility of research, ensuring due credit is given to original authors. In this comprehensive guide, we explore into the nuances of citing interviews, looking at the APA, MLA, and Chicago styles with a focus on creating full interview citations, in-text citations, and bibliography entries.

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Citation, a multifaceted practice, serves the dual purpose of crediting authors and facilitating source traceability. Plenty of citation styles arises from the diverse preferences and requirements of academic disciplines and publishers. Each citation style caters to specific academic disciplines and preferences, providing a diverse range of options for researchers and scholars.

STYLEFEATURES
APAIn-text citation, author-date format, emphasis on publication year, alphabetical reference list
MLAIn-text citation, author-page format, emphasis on page numbers, Works Cited page
ChicagoFootnotes or endnotes, bibliography, two documentation systems (notes and bibliography, author-date)
HarvardIn-text citation, author-date format, emphasis on publication year, reference list
IEEENumeric citation, bracketed numbers, references in numerical order, emphasis on publication year
VancouverNumeric citation, superscript numbers, list of references in numerical order
TurabianSimilar to Chicago style, designed for student research papers, notes and bibliography system
ASAIn-text citation, author-date format, emphasis on publication year, reference list

Why MLA, APA, and Chicago?

Understanding specific citation styles is crucial in academic writing. Among the commonly embraced styles, three stand out: MLA, APA, and Chicago. These styles play a significant role in shaping scholarly communication, which is why this guide focuses on them.

These three styles have become fundamental in academic institutions globally. MLA, known for its emphasis on literature and the humanities, is often used in language, literature, and cultural studies. APA, with its structured approach, is widely used in the social sciences, psychology, and education. Meanwhile, Chicago style, offering both notes and bibliography or author-date systems, is a versatile choice across disciplines.

In education, adherence to specific citation styles is more than a formality. It’s a skill that aids effective communication and showcases a researcher’s commitment to academic integrity. These styles provide a consistent framework for citing sources, allowing researchers to build on the knowledge of others while giving due credit. Mastering these styles will help you in contributing to academic conversations in a clear and organized manner.

How to Cite an Interview in APA

In the APA style, citing an interview follows a precise structure. The interviewer’s name, publication date, interview title, and source details play crucial roles. The in-text citation includes the interviewer’s last name and the publication year, ensuring clarity when quoting interviewee’s words.

Bibliography Entry

How to cite an interview

In-Text Citation

How to cite an interview

Citing an Interview in MLA

The MLA style adopts a distinctive approach to citing interviews. The interviewee takes precedence in the Works Cited entry, with the interview title, interviewer’s name, newspaper name, and publication details following suit (Ishiguro). In-text citations reference the interviewee’s last name.

Bibliography Entry

How to cite an interview

In-Text Citation

How to cite an interview

How an Interview is Cited in Chicago

Chicago style offers flexibility with two documentation systems. In the notes and bibliography system, the interviewee’s name, interview title, interviewer’s name, newspaper name, publication details, and URL comprise a comprehensive citation. The author-date system condenses this information within the text.

Bibliography Entry

How to cite an interview

Footnote

How to cite an interview

Conclusion

In academic writing, the art of citation remains a timeless practice. As we learn about the complexities of APA, MLA, and Chicago styles for citing interviews, it becomes evident that precision and attention to detail are paramount. By understanding the unique features of each style and avoiding common pitfalls, students and researchers can ensure their work stands as a proof of scholarly rigor and integrity. 

FAQ

What information is essential for citing interviews in MLA format?

In MLA format, essential information for citing interviews includes the name of the interviewee, the title of the interview (if applicable), the name of the interviewer, the publication or project name, the date of the interview, and the medium of the interview (e.g., Print, Web, TV). If the interview is part of a larger work like a book or a website, include that title as well.

Can I include a URL when citing an interview online?

You should include a URL when citing an interview accessed online. In most citation styles, including MLA and APA, it’s important to provide a URL or a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) to direct readers to the source. For online interviews, the URL is part of the citation to ensure the reader can locate the original source.

Is there a specific format for citing interviews in Chicago style?

Yes, there is a specific format for citing interviews in Chicago style. In notes and bibliography style, a note citation for an interview typically includes the name of the interviewee, the word ‘interviewed by’ followed by the interviewer’s name, the date of the interview, and the medium or format. In the bibliography, the interviewee’s name is listed first, followed by the interviewer’s name, the date, and the medium. The format varies slightly if the interview is part of a larger work or publication.

Do I need to provide page numbers for interview citations?

Providing page numbers for interview citations depends on the format of the interview. If the interview is part of a larger printed work like a book or a periodical, page numbers should be included in the citation. However, for interviews accessed online or those that are not part of a paginated work, page numbers are not applicable and therefore not included in the citation.

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