Protection of Migrants as a Factor of Social Stability (Excerpt)

Title Page

Dissertation Title Page

Abstract

This dissertation is dedicated to the issue of social instability caused by migrant populations relocating from other, often economically lacking countries. Though migrant communities do not act as a dynamic constituency of socio-political life, they can become the source of serious social issues resulting in instability and debilitating consequences—both for the migrants themselves and for the hosting society. In addition, it would be unfair to state both that migrants are never aggressive and provocative towards local populations, or that they silently suffer from the adverse attitude of the hosting society (…)

Acknowledgements

The original conception and ideas which have laid the foundation for this dissertation has changed significantly during the course of my research; respectively, the text of the dissertation has experienced certain alterations as well. However, I am convinced these changes have benefited the final result. The dissertation has become what it is through the prudent effort of my supervisor, who lead me away from the polemicist side of my writing and pushed me towards actual research. I would like to thank Dr. Colin Smith for his supervision, as it was he who showed me what real scientific research is, and thus contributed to the following text fundamentally.

I would also like to thank Liam Stonewort for his assistance with the massive statistical data which I had to process. Without his assistance, I would not have been able to sift through vast volumes of data (…)

Contents

Title ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 1
Abstract …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
Acknowledgements …………………………………………………………………………………… 4
Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 6
Sources and Methods ………………………………………………………………………………… 9
Key Findings ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14
1. [Key Finding 1] ……………………………………………………………………………………. 16
[detail 1] ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 25
[detail 2] ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 42
[detail 3] ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 60

2. [Key Finding 2] …………………………………………………………………………………….. 84
[detail 1] ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 93
[detail 2] ………………………………………………………………………………………………….104
[detail 3] ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 120

3. [Key Finding 3] ………………………………………………………………………………….. 137
[detail 1] ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 143
[detail 2] ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 159
[detail 3] ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 171

Conclusions …………………………………………………………………………………………… 190
References …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 200
Appendices ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 206

Introduction

The division of the modern world on the prospering and so-called “third-world” countries is not new. This term commonly refers to Central and South African countries, such as Chad or Niger, but to the same extent, it can be also applied to several Eastern European and Asian countries, such as Vietnam, Tajikistan, or Serbia. One of the most typical phenomenons for developing and third-world countries is labor migration; respectively, hosting countries experience an increase in the rise of xenophobia and crime (…)

National laws differ from country to country, and tend to change as time flows, as to the number and relative proportions of persons admitted from different countries and for varying reasons. There also can be other restrictions, such as limitations of access to the labor market for particular groups of migrants (Eurostat) (…)

Sources and Methods

The methodological basis of this dissertation lies in the scrupulous gathering and analyzing of data, received from select sources. During my research, I referred to such methods as interviews, content analysis, and statistical analysis. With the intent of supplying a clear picture of the conditions migrants face, I conducted several semi-structured interviews with them in order to provide eyewitnesses, as well as ascertain the further direction of my research. I interviewed 11 people aged from 16 to 58, both men and women; 4 interviews were conducted via email and Skype (the interviewees resided in other countries), the other 7 interviews were taken in-person (…)

(…) When analyzing statistical data, I focused on such indexes as:
- mortality rate
- amount of crimes committed by migrants
- amount of crimes committed against migrants (based on racial, nationality, gender, or other intolerance)
- average well-being level
- cases of disrespect of human rights, humiliation, etc.

Key Findings

“Millions of migrants provide essential services to the economies and societies of the countries they live in while supporting their families and communities back home, where remittances boost the national economy,” Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in a message marking International Migrants Day (UN News Centre).

(…)

This proves labor migration does not bring hosting countries expected benefits in the form of a cheap labor force that is eager to do any job, even the ones deemed as inhumane, for a rather small amount of compensation. This could be true for countries which have strict immigration laws, control the flow of foreign migrant workers, and have efficient methods of allocating and accommodating them. At the same time, some European countries do not demonstrate these qualities. In January 2011, Italy experienced a flood of immigrants from North Africa seeking work and refuge. According to approximate estimates, the number of migrants reached 23,000 individuals.

Italy had severe difficulties with the accommodation of migrants, especially considering the peak of the financial crisis which had spread over Europe. Experts claimed this immigration issue to be at least troubling—if not destabilizing—and adding an unwanted source of friction over NATO’s intervention of Libya (The New York Times).

(Three more pages about accommodation, allocation, and integration difficulties experienced by migrants and hosting countries)

The integration of migrants with the labor markets was also hampered by consistently higher levels of unemployment. These levels of unemployment were seen for both male and female migrants and for migrants of all scales of education, including those with the highest levels of qualification (Eurostat).

(…)

Conclusions (Outline)

- Restate the issue. Migrants as the source of serious social and economic problems.
- List negative consequences hosting countries face from migrants.
- Briefly restate key findings. List necessary measures for accommodating and protecting migrants.
- Show how migrant protection and accommodation benefits socio-political and economic stability.

References

Donadio, Rachel. “Fears About Immigrants Deepen Divisions in Europe.” The New York Times. N.p., 12 Apr. 2011. Web. 14 June 2013. <http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/13/world/europe/13europe.html?_r=0>.

Migrants in Europe: A Statistical Portrait of the First and Second Generation. ISBN 978-92-79-16231-2. Luxembourg: Eurostat European Comission, 2011. Web. 14 June 2013. <http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/page/portal/eurostat/home/>.

“UN Calls for Protection of Migrants’ Human Rights Regardless of Legal Status.” UN News Center. UN, 18 Dec. 2007. Web. 14 June 2013. <http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=25107>.

Appendices

(In this section, you should include all additional information which you have not included in the main body of your dissertation, but which still make out to be important evidence: graphs, charts, raw statistics, and so on. The appendices section is crucial for the support of your dissertation, so do not treat it as extra work.)

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