Presentation of Words to Avoid

The following is an example of how specific words should not be used in an academic paper, and how the text would look like without these words.

Words to Avoid Included:

The crow is a very intelligent bird from the Corvus species. Of course, their evolution has not been an overnight process, but rather a gradual one. The thing is, the ancestor of the crow first appeared in the Cretaceous Period, about 65 million years ago. They always flew above ground predators and gained sway in evolution through this defense mechanism. They never returned to their lizard-state of which they evolved from—instead they soared through the eons with gradually-developing intelligence that would become a modern-day miracle of genetics.

You won’t believe it, but crows can open doors, remember human languages as cue-signals, understand when a fire is going to come in 18 hours, and even recognize fear in a person by scanning their countenance. So, crows are much more brainy than the public has supposed—smarter than dogs and cats. A lot of individuals believe domestic pets such as felines and canines are beyond the intelligence of birds as a whole. A professor at the University of Miami, Donald Prackis, has noted that, “Crows are so smart, they can outwit canines and felines just to gather food for their young—especially when they are in an emergency situation that requires rations.” Stuff like this contributes to the study of crows as one of the most deeply-set brains in animal history.

It is nice to know that we have another creature among us that can learn human languages. They can really pick up on verbal cues used by humans. Many words like bye, hi, and other salutations can be recognized by crows for their meaning and sometimes context. In conclusion, doctor Brianna Solfed, zookeeper at the bird exhibit at the National Colorado Zoo, states, “Crows can understand us at the level of a 2 year-old human child, approximately.”

Firstly, this means we need to consider what we say around crows. Secondly, we should understand that crows can pick up on our verbal cues, even if they cannot discriminate exactly as to its actual subject matter. This could constitute as anything, as humans cannot fully comprehend a crow’s brain: we cannot know its true capacity or limit. It is kind of a conundrum—we need to understand these birds in able to get a full picture of our interaction with nature, yet we cannot develop a true understanding of its intelligence, even through the most advanced technological and scientific studies. To find out more about this, researchers have evaluated the human brain to understand a creature this complex in intelligence. A variety of new studies on the human brain is currently making the study of the crow’s brain capacity closer to a fully-realized reality with each passing year. Whether a crow, he or she, can be completely understood, we may never know.

Words to Avoid Not Included:

The crow is an intelligent bird from the Corvus species. Their evolution has not been an overnight process, but rather a gradual one. The ancestor of the crow first appeared in the Cretaceous Period, about 65 million years ago. They flew above ground predators and gained sway in evolution through this defense mechanism. They did not return to their lizard-state of which they evolved from—instead they soared through the eons with leisurely-developing intelligence that would become a modern-day miracle of genetics.

Crows can open doors, remember human languages as cue-signals, understand when a fire is going to come in 18 hours, and even recognize fear in a person by scanning their countenance. Crows are much more brainy than the public has supposed—smarter than dogs and cats. The public commonly believes domestic pets such as felines and canines are beyond the intelligence of birds as a whole. A professor at the University of Miami, Donald Prackis, has noted that, “Crows are so smart, they can outwit canines and felines just to gather food for their young—especially when they are in an emergency situation that requires rations.” This knowledge contributes to the study of crows as one of the most deeply-set brains in animal history.

It is beneficial to know we have another creature among us that can learn human languages. They can pick up on verbal cues used by humans. Words like bye, hi, and other salutations can be recognized by crows for their meaning and sometimes context. Doctor Brianna Solfed, zookeeper at the bird exhibit at the National Colorado Zoo, states, “Crows can understand us at the level of a 2 year-old human child, approximately.”

This amounts to our need to consider what we say around crows. We should understand that crows can pick up on our verbal cues, even if they cannot discriminate exactly as to its actual subject matter. Humans cannot fully comprehend a crow’s brain: we cannot know its true capacity or limit at this time. It is a conundrum—we need to understand these birds in able to get a full picture of our interaction with nature, yet we cannot develop a true understanding of its intelligence, even through the most advanced technological and scientific studies. Researchers have evaluated the human brain to understand a creature this complex in intelligence. New studies on the human brain, such as the Heinderber Crow Study at Harvard University, is currently expanding the knowledge of a crow’s brain capacity. Whether a crow can be completely understood, we may never know.

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