Rereading Your Writing

By Nicholas Klacsanzky

If you haven’t written anything yet, supposedly you don’t have writer’s block, and this post is not for you. All other writers, who already experienced this condition, you are welcome to read through.

how to broke writer's blockSo, you feel like you are stuck, like you’ve ran out of talent (yes, it’s absurd, but people sometimes say this), and have other blah-blah symptoms of writer’s block. What’s next? You have several options. One of them is to fall in despair and walk around your workplace wringing hands and waiting for inspiration. The second option is to reread my blog searching for tips and hints that could help overcome writer’s block. And the third variant is to reread your writing.

Yes, you haven’t misunderstood me. I believe that amateur writers, as well as professionals, have at least one-two really good written things in their arsenal. A short story, or a novel, or a poem, that all of your friends (or your blog’s audience, or your classmates, or whoever else) liked and appreciated. In other words, you most likely have pieces of writing that have gained recognition.

My advice is to reread them. Writer’s block is (among other things) about having doubts about one’s creative capabilities. Get rid of these doubts! Read those of your stories that were sincerely approved by others. If it does not convince you of your talent, reread the pieces of writing that you enjoyed writing the most.

Personally I do it from time to time–just for prophylaxis. I read through what I was thinking five, ten years ago, and feel amazed. Sometimes I get a feeling like, “Wait, did I write this myself? It’s awesome!” Or, which can be equally pleasant, one of my friends exclaims: “Wait, did you write this? It’s awesome!”

Witnessing your former successes can be inspiring. It can give you a push, like, “Come on, dude, you know you can write great! Just look at those older gems. Come on, I know you can perform even better today.”

It’s not a universal and 100% guaranteed method, but it can become an additional stimuli for you on your way out of writer’s block.

Well, that’s all for today. Stay updated for more tips on writing!


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