The Love of Money is a Root of Evil

Thinkers of many cultures and epochs have sought to find the fundamental reasons for social problems. Philosophers of the past analyzed numerous contributing factors, such as leaders, money, religion, and so on. A significant number of these thinkers came to the conclusion that an individuals’ passionate attitude towards money was an influential trigger of various social calamities. Desiring to obtain more and more material goods and profit causes an individual to become selfish and hard-hearted—this in turn affects the quality of a whole community. An uncontrolled love of money is the reason for many disturbances and wrongs which are enacted. greed

Apostle Paul, in his letter to Timothy, today known as Timothy I, says, “…they that desire to be rich, fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful desires, which plunge men into destruction and perdition. For the love of money is the root of all evils; which some coveting, have erred from the faith.” Paul emphasizes the pursuit of money and financial gain causes one to be distanced from one’s morality and virtue. No longer do people seek to build a relationship with their neighbor; instead, they seek for ways to use them to obtain more wealth and security. At the same time, people who treat others as a means of reaching their goals tend to be treated in the same manner, thus multiplying their own misfortunes.

People with a strong lust for money can develop an insensible disposition. In the discipline of psychology, there exists a correlation between happy feelings and money which has already been discovered (Vohs, Mead & Goode, 2008). Those who have a strong love of money constantly feel the urge to gain more money as if they have a lack of it; consequently, these individuals have a bad disposition and are impatient when confronted with those whom they believe are seeking to prevent them from gaining money.

Because of a fanatic identification with their savings, those with a persistent love of money are hesitant to lose their capital. Such individuals are hesitant in investing in community projects or remaining loyal to their fellow coworkers, employees, and even neighbors. Today, because of the apparent focus on obtaining more entertainment devices, cars, games, and technology in general, the sense of community is dying. Paul Mattick states in his book Art in It’s Time that, “A steady increase of the love of money present in our capitalistic economy system causes a sense of community to decline as faith is placed in material things for the self rather than concepts for the community” (Mattick, 2003).

In an attempt to understand the true nature of different social problems of the past and of today, many thinkers have paid attention to the phenomenon of yearning for money. Because of an individual’s love of money, there is a decline in personal values and morals. Subsequently, the constant pursuit of money causes one’s behavior to be well under par with the needs of other human beings. In addition, many people with an excessive passion for gaining money tend to identify themselves with their financial well-being, thus being afraid to lose their capital. In their fear, they lose the greatest of all values: a sense of peace.


Mattick, Paul. Art in It’s Time. London: Routledge, 2003. Print.

Vohs, Kathleen D., Nicole L. Mead and Miranda R. Goode. “Merely Activating the Concept of Money Changes Personal and Interpersonal Behavior.” 2008. Web. 8 January 2012.


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