Cooperating with Other Writers

By Nicholas Klacsanzky

Hi everyone!

how to make a co-authorshipIf you are like me, you probably like doing everything on your own. There is definitely something special about knowing everything you do depends solely on you, and the outcomes are the 100% result of your own doing. However, there are occasions when a single person is hardly capable of doing something. In the context of my blog, I am talking about writing, of course.

How is this possible? Imagine you are a perfect idea generator. You can come up with tons of interesting thoughts about potential screenplays, novels, or stories. However, when you try to write one, you discover your literary skills are so far from those needed to accomplish your grandiose plans. That’s quite a problem, especially when you are short-tempered and hate to see your ideas not being manifested immediately.

At the same time, for example, you have a friend whom (as you know) is good at expressing his thoughts, and who you think would become a decent writer if only that friend of yours didn’t have a crisis of ideas, a writer’s block. Attempting to write anything, this poor guy would sit at the monitor for hours without even starting to write.

Or on the contrary, you are a writer, and your friend is the idea generator. It doesn’t matter.

The solution is obvious, isn’t it?

Right, cooperation. Or, it would be better to say “co-authorship.” Co-authorship is a normal practice not only in the extreme cases as the one I’ve described. Writers often cooperate when they work on novels, on a complicated scientific or academic research, during a journalistic investigation, and so on. You can apply this practice to your creativity as well! Figure out what you can do best and worst in terms of writing. Then, do the same with people you are planning to work with; interview them, give them a test assignment, and so on.

The best would be to talk to your friends about it. Anyways, don’t make it super-serious; treat it more like a game, entertainment, because if you make people think you want them to work hard, most likely they will refuse the opportunity for co-authorship.

After you learn your (and your partner’s) strong and weak sides, you can allocate roles and start writing. Make sure not to deny your partner their share of your work if he or she feels capable of completing it, and don’t hesitate to do the same. Co-authorship is live interaction, not stiffly fixed duties.

Working in a co-authorship may sometimes be more difficult than working on your own; but at the same time, when you get accustomed to each other, your efficiency will increase dramatically.

Just try it. It’s fun!

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